Human

Research shows that painkillers such as aspirin make antidepressants and prozac a lot less effective. The result is quite surprising. Inflammation worsens or causes depression. Tackling them should alleviate or reduce the symptoms of depression, the researchers reasoned.

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New research indicates that drinking coffee reduces the chance of a common form of skin cancer - basal cell carcinoma. The more coffee (with caffeine) you drink, the smaller the chance. Scientists draw that conclusion based on the Nurses' Health Study. Since 1976, tens of thousands of nurses have been closely monitored for this study.

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People who like to watch crime series like Law & Order, CSI and NCIS are much stronger than people who do not follow these series, are inclined to intervene when they see someone being assaulted on the street. Assault was once a taboo subject. But that has changed. Previous investigations have already shown that crime series show on average about six violent actions per hour and that about ten percent of them concern sexual violence.

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Cucumbers from Spain are said to be the source of the EHEC outbreak in Germany, according to research today. Researchers found a variant of the E.coli bacterium on four cucumbers. Three of them are from Spain. The origin of the others is unknown. One of the Spanish suppliers would supply organic cucumbers.

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People who are tall have a greater risk of ten different types of cancer. This appears from a large-scale study. Scientists from Oxford University studied no less than one million women. They discovered that women who were taller than 1.52 meters were at greater risk of cancer.

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The hormone oxytocin ensures that we trust other people more and encourages feelings of love. But there are limits, new research shows. The hormone only provides trust and love towards people who belong to the same group. Psychologists therefore conclude that the gene may be closely involved in ethnocentrism.

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When smokers see how actors light a cigarette on the silver screen, it makes sense that they themselves also feel like a cigarette. But it goes much further, new research shows. Seeing a smoking film star activates specific parts of the brain of a smoker: the parts that a smoker needs to exactly repeat the action of the film star.

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Allergies are very annoying, but also very useful. For example, it seems that allergies protect people against various disorders, including cancer. Research shows that. According to experts, the allergic reactions stimulate the immune system. Research shows that children with an allergy to certain substances in the air have a 40 percent lower risk of leukemia.

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Spread your legs and hang your hands sideways or over your desk while your fingertips are resting on the desktop: it is not a key to success. In 2010, two Harvard University researchers concluded that people have a greater chance of success in their lives if they embrace the 'power pose'. Such a power pose is really nothing more than a way to make yourself look bigger, for example by spreading your legs and putting your hands to the side.

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People who overcome breast cancer and then regularly take aspirin have a smaller chance of dying from breast cancer. The chance of the disease coming back or spreading through their bodies is also considerably smaller. Research shows that. Breast cancer patients often continue to take aspirin after their illness to prevent heart disease.

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Scientists have developed a simple but effective test with which they can use the breath of people to find out whether they have cancer or not. It is even possible to 'see' where the cancer is based on the breath test. People with cancer exhale certain molecules that indicate that the disease has struck.

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A cochlear implant is a nice solution for deaf people. This implant converts sound into electrical pulses that directly stimulate the auditory nerve in the cochlea. In this way someone can again perceive sounds, sounds and speech to a limited extent. Yet there are also disadvantages. After all, an operation must be carried out - with all the associated risks - and it will soon cost tens of thousands of euros.

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Thanks to new media, the bad news about wars, accidents, murders and other suffering is rushing at us. And especially for women that is quite difficult, according to new research. The bad news hits them - certainly in comparison with men - hard. The researchers collected 60 test subjects and divided them into four groups.

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For several decades, researchers have suspected that the Batseba painted by Rembrandt in 1654 had breast cancer. The woman has a bruise on the chest and a swelling under her armpit. But new research indicates that it is not breast cancer. The University of Twente reports this. Scientists from the university unleashed computer simulations on the issue and argued that it is very unlikely that the Batseba depicted in the painting - or rather the woman who stood in front of her model - had breast cancer.

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When a sleepwalker is hurt while sleeping, he often does not feel it, new research suggests. Scientists gathered 100 people who regularly sleepwalking (55 men and 45 women) and 100 people who did not (the control group). The pain complaints that the test subjects had during the day were, among other things, determined with the help of questionnaires.

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People with many birthmarks remain younger both inside and out. Researchers conclude that. The cells of people with many birthmarks are able to renew themselves more often. Incidentally, all that youthfulness comes with a price: a large amount of birthmarks is associated with a greater risk of (skin) cancer.

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The Titanic is a super-sick film and yet we watched it en masse. Scientists now think they know why. If you browse through the television guide for a moment, you will see that there are enough tragedies on the screen. Drama films, drama series and talk shows in which people talk about the saddest events in their lives.

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After a lack of sleep, our brain encourages us much more to work in on unhealthy food (junk food). This is apparent from fMRI scans. Scientists gathered 25 men and women. The test subjects were given four or nine hours to sleep. Then they had to look at photos. The photos showed unhealthy and healthy food.

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Long-term exposure to high concentrations of particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) appears to have a negative effect on sleep. Scientists studied 1863 American test subjects. They had an average age of 68 and wore a wristband seven days in a row that monitored their movements.

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