History

Archaeologists have found one of the oldest sundials in the world in the King's Valley in Egypt. The archaeologists found the sundial - a piece of limestone with a hole in it and lines on it - when they cleared the entrance to a tomb. The sundial is a flat piece of limestone. A semicircle is drawn on the stone.

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Scientists have discovered the fossil remains of an 8.6-meter sea monster in the Nevada desert. The huge beast was at the head of the food chain in the water and ate prey about the size of itself. The sea monster has been named Thalattoarchon saurophagis.

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The stretcher on which the mummies were transported to their final resting place has also been found. In the southern city of Aswan in Egypt, archaeologists have dug up a well-preserved tomb from the sand. "The grave dates from the late Roman-Greek period and belongs to a person named Tjt," said Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Egyptian High Council of Antiquities.

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In Roman mosaics there are sometimes Greek gods or heroes. New research now indicates that the Romans did this consciously: the elite used the Greek gods and heroes as symbols of universal values ​​with which they and Rome wanted to be associated. One of the Greek heroes who regularly appears in Roman scenes, for example, is Achilles (you can see him in the image above).

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Archaeologists have found the remains of a witch doctor in Peru. The witch not only healed people, but also spoke to the gods and is said to have owned aphrodisiacs. This medicine stimulates the sex drive. The witch's discovery was accompanied by many more interesting archaeological excavations.

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At the end of the thirteenth century they suddenly appeared: very accurate maps of the Mediterranean and Black Sea. For a long time, researchers assumed that medieval European cartographers made the maps. But new research from Utrecht University now refutes that: the maps cannot have been made in medieval Europe.

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The parts of an old Roman law were thought to have been lost forever, but they were found again. Researchers put together seventeen separate fragments of a previously incomprehensible text and discovered that it was the lost Roman law text. The law is part of the Gregorian Code, a collection of laws from the time of the rulers Hadrian (117 to 138 AD) to Diocletian (284 to 305 AD).

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For Viking children, this miniature version of a Viking ship must have been "very cool". Archaeologists discovered the boat in an old well that belonged to a small farm and was closed almost 1,000 years ago - for unknown reasons. The boat has been carefully carved from a piece of wood and has a prow that strongly resembles the bow of a Viking ship.

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The Peruvian government has announced that it has found tombs in the Cuzco region, where the Incas would later rule. The discovery can change our view of the creation of the mighty Inca empire. The tombs come from the Wari culture, a civilization that flourished in the Andes between the years 700 and 1200 - more than two centuries before the Incas.

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A well-known theory that has been used for years when trying to explain the sinking of the Titanic is the theory that an exceptionally large number of icebergs could be found in the waters in that year. A new study is now sweeping that theory down: there were many icebergs to be found in 1912, but it is not about extreme quantities.

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The legend says that an enormous flood led to the emergence of Chinese civilization. And scientists now think they have found traces of that flood. According to legends and historical sources, the Yellow River broke its banks sometime in the third millennium BC. It led to major problems.

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The faces of us and our ancestors have evolved to better cope with blows. This is according to a study by scientists from the University of Utah. The Australopithecus in particular underwent major changes in the face. The Australopithecus is an extinct genus of hominids that lived between 4.3 and two million years ago.

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A paint here, mosaic there, some trash cans in a corner, three bathrooms, a toilet and at least two slaves to keep it all clean and tidy. Anyone who zaps along the different television channels on a weekday evening cannot ignore it: the living programs. On one channel, helpless men in need of help are helped out of the fire, a little further on an old bookcase is given a new lease of life by means of a new coat of paint and another channel further down is home stylists working on a canal house.

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The mosaic is invaluable and beautifully preserved. During Roman times it was in the Roman province of Syria. Scientists made the discovery in the old town of Doliche. In Roman times the city was part of the Roman province of Syria. Today we find the remains of the city on the outskirts of the Turkish city of Gaziantep.

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A 72 million-year-old herbivore in Mexico used its more than one meter long horns to adorn partners. The so-called Coahuilaceratops magnacuerna is the largest horned dinosaur species ever discovered. In addition, the dinosaur has an unusual, round nose. This is what the paleontologists team claims.

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Scientists have discovered a beautiful fossil of a pterosaur and her egg. The fossil indicates that the animals produced a hatch of juveniles and then ran away. That means that the little pterosaurs had to take care of themselves from the day they hatched. There is a good chance that the little ones could fly immediately.

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The dinosaur Sinocalliopteryx could not fly, but he did eat flying dinosaurs. This is the conclusion of a study by scientists from the University of Alberta. The scientists discovered fossils of three flying dinosaurs in the stomach of a fossilized Sinocalliopteryx. The Sinocalliopteryx was a feathered dinosaur with the looks of a bird of prey.

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The unique reliefs would be around 2000 years old. Archaeologists discovered the sculptures carved into a number of rocks in northwestern Saudi Arabia. Although the reliefs are eroded and no longer intact, the archaeologists were able to identify a total of about twelve camel and equidae.

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